Guns of the Magnificent Seven

From The Spaghetti Western Database

Guns of the Magnificent Seven (USA 1968 / Director: Paul Wendkos)

  • This is a US western shot in Spain
  • Runtime: 105 min
  • Release Date: 30.7.1969
  • Filming Locations: Almería, Andalucí­a (Spain)

Also known as

La furia de los 7 magnificos (Spain) | La furia de los siete magnificos (Spain) Le pistole dei magnigici 7 (Italy) | Les colts des sept mercenaries (France) | Die Rache der glorreichen Sieben (Germany) | De 7 slar till (Sweden) | Kolty siedmiu wspaniałych (Poland) | A revolta do sete homens (Argentina)

Cast and crew

  • Cast: George Kennedy (Chris Adams), James Whitmore (Levi Morgan), Monte Markham (Keno), Reni Santoni (Maximiliano O'Leary), Frank Silvera (Lobero), Bernie Casey (Cassie), Joe Don Baker (Slater), Scott Thomas (P.J.), Fernando Rey (Quintero), Michael Ansara (Colonel Diego), Tony Davis (Emil), Wende Wagner (Tina), Sancho Gracia (Miguel), Luis Rivera (Lieutenant Prensa), George Rigaud [as Jorge Rigaud](Gabriel)
  • Also with: Charles Stalmaker (horse owner), Vicente Sangiovanni (Manuel), Ramón Serrano (Cesar)
  • Story: Herman Hoffman
  • Screenplay: Herman Hoffman
  • Cinematography: Antonio Macasoli [Deluxe Color - Panavision 2,35:1]
  • Music: Elmer Bernstein
  • Producer: Vincent M. Fennelly

Synopsis

Chris (Kennedy) hires six mercenaries to help free a Mexican revolutionary from prison.

Comment

After the let-down that was Return of the Seven, it's good to know that the Magnificent Seven are in safe hands again. Dropping Yul Brynner and bringing on George Kennedy to play Chris was a risky move, but it pays off. He may not look anything like the Chris from the previous two films, but Kennedy brings confidence and gravity to the role that strangely deserted the ill-at-ease Lee Van Cleef when he played him for the final sequel, The Magnificent Seven Ride. There is a Zapata-like plot with Chris freeing a Mexican revolutionary, but to be honest, that's about it for Spaghetti Western influences. A Euro-Western it might be labelled, but it's closer to John Wayne than Clint Eastwood. So, don't expect a bloody, gritty Spaghetti with priests ears being cut off and forced to eat it, but an enjoyable Sunday afternoon western that, while it isn't as good as the original and not a violent, savage and sickening death of beating in sight, as you get in the really good Spaghetti Westerns, it can be liked and remembered with fondness.-- John Welles 2/11/09

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