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SWDB Hall of Fame/Producers

From The Spaghetti Western Database

< SWDB Hall of Fame

Producer.png Manolo BologniniAlberto GrimaldiDino De LaurentiisFulvio MorsellaItalo Zingarelli

Manolo Bolognini

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Manolo Bolognini

Born - 1926 After working as a production secretary on Federico Fellini’s Nights of Cabiria (1957), and as a productin manager on Pier Paolo Pasolini’s The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964), Bolognini produced seven Spaghetti Westerns. His first was the highly influential Django (1966), which was a massive box office hit. He went on to produce Texas Adios (1966), Rita of the West (1967), and The Forgotten Pistolero (1969). He produced the final installment of the “Cat Stevens” trilogy, Boot Hill (1969), which was another big hit. He also produced two highly regarded late-era Spaghetti Westerns, Keoma (1976) and California (1977). Besides westerns, he also produced Nostalghia (1983), Teorema (1968), and The Fifth Cord (1971).
Year of Induction: 2010

Alberto Grimaldi

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Alberto Grimaldi

March 28, 1925 (Naples, Italy)- Perhaps the most important producer of Spaghetti Westerns, he produced some of the finest and most well known examples of the genre. Among these are two of Sergio Leone’s masterpieces, For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, The Bad and the Ugly (1966). He also produced The Big Gundown (1966), Face to Face (1967), The Mercenary (1968), Sabata (1969), and Man of the East (1972), all of which were highly successful. Overall he produced 15 Italian and Euro-westerns. He produced close to 30 non-westerns as well, including the Oscar nominated Gangs of New York (2002), as well as Last Tango in Paris (1972), Salo or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), Novacento (1976), Fellini Satyricon (1969), The Decameron (1971), and Fellini’s Casanova (1976).
Year of Induction: 2010

Dino De Laurentiis

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Dino De Laurentiis

August 8, 1919 (Torre Annunziata, Italy)- November 11, 2010 (Beverly Hills, California, U.S.A.) He is known as one of Hollywood’s leading veteran producers, having backed over 140 films dating back to the early 1940s, from mainstream blockbusters to cult B classics. He also produced three Spaghetti Westerns, including The Hills Run Red (1966), and Navajo Joe (1966). In the 1970s he produced three Euro-westerns, A Man Called Sledge (1970), The Deserter (1971) and Chino (1973). He also produced a trio of American westerns, Buffalo Bill and the Indians (1976), The Shootist (1976), and The White Buffalo (1977). His non-western resume is extensive. In earlier decades he produced La Strada (1954), Nights of Cabiria (1957) and Barbarella (1968). He went on to produce Serpico (1973), Conan the Barbarian (1982), Dune (1984), and Manhunter (1986). In more recent decades he has produced Army of Darkness (1992), Hannibal (2001) and Red Dragon (2002).
Year of Induction: 2010

Fulvio Morsella

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Fulvio Morsella

Born ??? – December, 2002 (Rome, Italy) Best known for his associations with Sergio Leone, he had a hand in helping to make several of Leone’s western masterpieces. He first got credit as a writer, helping to build the story and scenarios of Leone’s For a Few Dollars More (1965). He went on to be a producer on two of Leone’s directorial efforts, the masterpiece Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), and Duck, You Sucker (1971). He continued to collaborate with Leone, co-producing and co-writing with him on My Name is Nobody (1973), and A Genius, Two Partners and a Dupe AKA Nobody’s the Greatest (1975).
Year of Induction: 2010

Italo Zingarelli

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Italo Zingarelli

Born January 15, 1930 (Lugo, Italy)- April 28, 2000 (Rome, Italy) Zingarelli produced eight Italian and Euro Westerns, and is credited with first conceiving the the blockbuster team of Terence Hill and Bud Spencer. He started out as an extra, stuntman, production manager, and writer on films. He later became a producer, backing westerns such as Johnny Yuma (1966), and The Five Man Army (1969), the latter of which he also directed. He collaborated with Hill and Spencer on three westerns, all of which were huge box office successes; God Forgives, I Don’t (1968), They Call Me Trinity (1970) and Trinity is Still My Name (1971). Outside of westerns, he collaborated with Hill and Spencer on two films, producing All the Way Boys AKA Plane Crazy (1972), and directing I’m For the Hippopotamus (1979). He also produced The Blanchville Monster (1963), and Amuck (1972).
Year of Induction: 2010

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