SWDB Hall of Fame/Cinematographers

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Cinema.png Enzo BarboniTonino Delli ColliMassimo DallamanoStelvio MassiAlejandro Ulloa

Enzo Barboni

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Enzo Barboni aka E.B. Clucher

July 10, 1922 (Rome, Italy)- March 23, 2002 (Rome, Italy) Under the alias of E.B. Clucher, he is best known for writing and directing They Call Me Trinity (1970) and Trinity is Still My Name (1971), both comedies among the top grossing Spaghetti Westerns in history, along with making household names out of its stars, Terence Hill and Bud Spencer. Before hitting it big as a director however, Barboni was one of Italy’s premier cinematographers, working on 11 Spaghetti Westerns including Django (1966), Texas Adios (1966), The Bounty Killer (1967), The Hellbenders (1967), Rita of the West (1967), Django, Prepare a Coffin AKA Viva Django (1968) and The Five Man Army (1970). Rumor has it that it was Barboni who first gave Sergio Leone the idea of adapting Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo into a western, which would ultimately become A Fistful of Dollars. He was also the cinematographer for non-westerns such as Nightmare Castle (1965), Gidget Goes to Rome (1963), and Duel of the Titans (1961). He went on to direct five Spaghetti Westerns, including the aforementioned “Trinity” films as well as Man of the East (1972). He also wrote the screenplay for They Call Him Cemetery (1971). As a director of non-western comedies, he continued working with either Hill, Spencer, or both, writing and directing Crime Busters (1977) and Even Angels Eat Beans (1973), and directing Double Trouble (1984), Go For It (1983) and They Call Me Renegade (1987).
Year of Induction: 2010

Tonino Delli Colli

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Tonino Delli Colli

November 20, 1922 (Rome, Italy)- August 16, 2005 (Rome, Italy) Delli Colli cinematographed nearly 140 films in a 60 year career, including two of Sergio Leone’s westerns, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) and Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). He also worked as a cinematographer for Io son oil captaz (1951), one of Italy’s very first westerns, as well as the comedy Spaghetti Western Deaf Smith and Johnny Ears (1972). Outside of the Spaghetti Western genre, he cinematographed Toto in Color (1952), the first Italian film in color, as well as Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), one of twelve collaborations with Pier Paolo Pasolini. He also provided cinematography for Leone’s Once Upon a Time in America (1984), The Name of the Rose (1986), and the Academy Award winning Life is Beautiful (1997), the latter two winning him two of his career four David di Donatello awards for best cinematography. Working with some of the most acclaimed European directors, he also cinematographed three Roman Polanski films, and four of Federico Fellini’s.
Year of Induction: 2010

Massimo Dallamano

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Massimo Dallamano

April 17, 1917 (Milan, Italy)- November 4, 1976 (Rome, Italy) Dallamano is perhaps best known for being the cinematographer of Sergio Leone’s first two westerns, A Fistful of Dollars (1964) and For a Few Dollars More (1965). He cinematographed three other Spaghetti Westerns including Gunfight at Red Sands (1963). His first and only Spaghetti Western directorial effort was the highly regarded Bandidos (1967). Dallamano was the cinematographer for over 30 films, including Love and Larceny (1960) and Constantine and the Cross (1962) but switched to directing and screenwriting during the mid 1960s. He co-wrote and directed two well regarded gialli, What Have They Done to Solange? (1972) and The Police Want Help AkA Coed Murders (1974), as well as Dorian Gray (1970), Venus in Furs AKA Devil in the Flesh (1969), The Cursed Medallion AKA The Night Child (1975) and Colt 38 Special Squad.
Year of Induction: 2010

Stelvio Massi

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Stelvio Massi

March 26, 1929 (Civitanova Marche, Italy)- March 26, 2004 (Velletri, Italy) The multitalented Massi started out as a camera operator , working in this capacity on three Spaghetti Westerns, including Sergio Leone’s A Fistful of Dollars (1964). He then progressed to cinematography, working frequently with director Giuliano Carnimeo. He cinematographed thirteen Spaghetti Westerns including The Price of Power (1969), Have a Good Funeral, Sartana Will Pay (1970), Sartana’s Here, Trade Your Pistol For a Coffin AKA Fistful of Lead (1970), They Call Me Hallelujah (1971) and They Call Him Cemtery (1971). Overall, he was the cinematographer for nearly fifty films, including The Case of the Bloody Iris (1972) and Giovannanona Long-Thigh (1973). He was also an accomplished director of over thirty films as well as an occasional screenwriter. His best known directorial efforts were the Fred Williamson actioner The Black Cobra (1987) and the Tomas Milian Euro-Crime film Emergency Squad (1974). During the 1980s he was sometimes credited as Stefano Catalano and Max Steel.
Year of Induction: 2010

Alejandro Ulloa

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Alejandro Ulloa

September 14, 1926 (Madrid, Spain) The son of a director, he was one of Spain’s premier cinematographers, working on well over one hundred films, including twenty-one Spaghetti Westerns. Among the better known westerns that he worked on were Sugar Colt (1966), The Mercenary (1968), Companeros (1970), Bad Man’s River (1971), Sonny and Jed (1972), A Reason to Live, A Reason to Die (1972), The Stranger and the Gunfighter (1974), Pancho Villa (1971) and Cipolla Colt (1975). Outside of the western genre, Ulloa worked often in comedies as well as frequently with some of the best known Spanish and Italian explotation directors. He worked as a cinematographer on Atraco a las tres (1962), The Diabolical Dr. Z (1966), Perversion Story (1969), Forbidden Photos of a Lady Beyond Suspicion (1970), (1972), Horror Express (1972), High Crime (1973), Night of the Werewolf (1981), and Conquest (1983). He also worked as second unit director of photography on Chimes at Midnight (1965).
Year of Induction: 2010

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